Heavenly Hellebores

Early spring is when one plant in particular, the Hellebore, becomes the star of the show. More commonly known as the Lenten Rose hellebores are perennial which means the plant will come up year after year.  They belong in the Ranunculaceae family with 15 species within the genus. Most of the modern new hybrids are crosses from Hellebore orientalis and John Massey of Ashwood Nurseries in the Midlands has created a number of award winning cultivars.  They provide a splash of colour in the garden when everything else is waiting for warmer weather to return. Always trim the foliage down to the ground in the Autumn to avoid black spot and other diseases being carried in the leaves. They thrive in neutral or slightly alkaline soil especially when organic matter is incorporated into the soil. Position them in a shaded or partially shaded area where they will seed freely or multiple through division. Seed can be collected in June and sown fresh in seed trays which will start a new generation of hellebores for your garden. The petals are actually sepals (modified leaves) which means they stay on the plant for about two months providing a lasting display. To admire the detail of the inner sepal  markings collect a few flowers and float them in a bowl of water indoors for everyone to enjoy.

IMG-20160223-WA0003

IMG-20160223-WA0004

 

Published by

Kirsty Wilson

Horticulture is my inspiration! I am the Herbaceous Supervisor at the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh. Photographer, Award winning Garden Designer and Beechgrove Garden television presenter. I want to inspire people to grow plants, connect with nature and have a positive impact on the world.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s