Crathes Castle

One of the National Trust for Scotland’s flagship gardens. The walled garden at Crathes Castle near Aberdeen is world class and worth exploring, particularly during the summer. It is one of the UK’s most northerly Arts and Crafts Gardens which Gertrude Jekyll visited and influenced. The walled garden is positioned South East of the Castle and covers 3.75 acres. It is divided into 8 sections or ‘garden rooms.’ The diversity of shrubs, plants and trees is outstanding. Much of the framework of the garden is made up of yew which dates from the 1700s which adds a magical charm to the atmosphere. There are superb glasshouses with vines and peaches and also a display of tender plants and the Malmaison carnations. These carnations came from France where its large flower that was scented soon became popular in the 19th century. Many in the past would reach 6ft with blooms reaching 15cm wide which were hugely popular in country homes.  The white plantings at Crathes pre date that of the famous Sissinghurst white garden. There is also a perfectly manicured croquet law, fountain, rose garden and world renowned June borders which provide outstanding summer hues. Outside the walled garden there are large areas of woodland to explore as well as the castle itself.

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Published by

Kirsty Wilson

Horticulture is my inspiration! I am the Herbaceous Supervisor at the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh. Photographer, Award winning Garden Designer and Beechgrove Garden television presenter. I want to inspire people to grow plants, connect with nature and have a positive impact on the world.

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